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FINAL PROJECT
DELIVERABLE

use statistics facts numbers to support 

(Approx.  8-10 pages, single-spaced)
Time Expectation: 18-20 Hours

  • Original research including readings, interviews, site visits and any data analysis
    (8 hours)
  • Synthesizing, writing, drafting and designing of the final document
    (10-12 hours)

A data-driven operational plan for a specific and unique urban issue

The main assignment for this class is the development of an operational plan for a data-driven policy and program reform in one government department/agency (e.g. public safety, transportation) or nonprofit (e.g. the Red Cross or Rockefeller Foundation). The emphasis must be on reforming an existing program with new ideas (i.e. avoid suggesting the creation of a new department, but rather something that can be implemented within the current structure with organizational changes.). You will identify an area that has potential for significant impact. Focus could be on on specific or combinations of the following:

  • Planning process
  • Culture change and training
  • Partnership management
  • Data management or technological implementation
  • Organizational structure
  • Community engagement

The plan must be related to existing efforts, assessment of the department or nonprofit, and identification of at least one new technology or platform to be applied. 

The plan should also include an assessment of impact to communities; race and equity; and examples of similar reform plans from other agencies, cities, or organizations. The core elements of the plan will be developed in a series of parts, based on the modules of the course and should encapsulate discussion questions, various writing assignments and original research that you will conduct independently.

Attached are some A grade examples:

BUILDING BANDUNG
DIGITAL SERVICE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATICS REFORM PLAN

Civic Analytics and Urban Intelligence
Hanfie Vandanu
[email protected]

BANDUNG, JAWA BARAT
INDONESIA

Since the 2010s, cities have focused on smart cities development in
Indonesia. Many local governments have been trying to adapt and utilize
the digital solution to help serve their citizen. Bandung city is one of the
cities actively launching digital services through its agency. Yet,
Bandung’s department of information of technology has not been able to
adapt to the required changes to accommodate the faster technology
and data-based initiatives.

The city has not followed the new needs of the smart city initiative to
transform its organizational structure to accommodate a more fast, quick
response to change and iterative development. Current structure and
people formation has been a challenge for Bandung city to adapt quickly.
Reform action is needed to improve city performance on delivering
technology solutions.

The Bandung Digital Service Master Plan is a vision for Bandung’s digital
reform. It tackles today’s challenges of mishandling of technological
practices within the administration. The master plan is written to prepare
the government to utilize the technology to help serve citizens better. It
will showcase the current issue and opportunity to resolve it and show
the strategy that can be implemented for Bandung’s digital transition.

E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

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Currently, most digital products and services of Bandung city are
being handled through the procurement process by hiring IT vendors
to develop a product. The current organizational structure and talent
formation in the informatics department of Bandung city is not ready
for a quicker technology and data-based product and services
development.

The present talent structure is more dedicated to informatics policy
development than products and services development. Existing
products and services provided by the government are not
maintained, many display outdated information. Some of them also
have low-quality and fragmented products. The current structure and
process are not ideal for the city to move forward.

There is a need to reform the current organization and talent structure
within the Bandung city informatics department. This reform is
needed so that the administration can utilize the technology to serve
the citizen effectively and efficiently.

THE STATE OF
Bandung City Administration’s
Technology Ecosystem

About: Organization –

Vaishnavi Muthukrishnan (N13910281)
Civic Analytics and Urban Intelligence
Project Report

Project: Facilitating School-Business partnerships to enhance NYC DOE’s
sustainability plans

INDEX

Executive Summary

Analyzing stakeholders

and funding

Challenges anticipated

and mitigation plans

Future Scope & Conclusion

Pro tip: Click

on the boxes

to directly

access

respective

sections

Proposed solution

Implementation roll-out

plan

Introduction

Vaishnavi Muthukrishnan (N13910281)
Civic Analytics and Urban Intelligence
Project Report

Project: Facilitating School-Business partnerships to enhance NYC DOE’s
sustainability plans

1. Executive Summary

The NYC Department of Education’s sustainability program is a pioneering endeavor to

include schools and students in the war against the most important enemy of our times –

Climate Change. The DOE and its schools are putting their best foot forward; however,

they struggle with scaling and innovation without easily accessible expert help and

support. In this paper, I recommend a solution of data and technology and manual efforts

that can help build a decentralized collaboration between NYC Schools and NYC

Businesses (for-profit and non-profit) to help enhance school sustainability efforts and

quality of sustainability education amongst students. The meaningful partnerships

facilitated can ensure that schools are not just ramping up their existing improvements,

but also play an important role in ensuring that the next generation is mentored well and

prepared to take charge. The future is green!

2. Introduction

2.1 NYC DOE Office of Sustainability

New York City has formed a dedicated Office of Sustainability in its Department
of Education. The Office has designed programs to help schools participate in
waste management, recycling, in-school gardening, energy upgrades, and
most importantly educate and engage students in various sustainability
initiatives and policies. Their key commitments are [1]:
â–ª Improving school building environments by reducing greenhouse gas

emissions, maximizing waste diversion, and creating green spaces

â–ª Empowering diverse school communities to create positive, sustainable

changes

â–ª Creating meaningful learning experiences for all stakeholders by

developing coalitions and communities

â–ª Developing new approaches, partnerships, and implementing technologies

to drive school facility improvements and address dynamic community

needs in a changing climate

2.2 Susta

1

MAKING SINGAPORE A MORE

Reducing bird collisions into buildings in Singapore

BIRD-FRIENDLY CITY

Report by Xavier Neo

2

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

As a world-renowned biophilic City in Nature, Singapore is home to over 300 native

bird species and serves as an important pitstop for many endangered migratory

shorebirds. However, many birds fall victim to building collisions – estimated to cause

a third of all native bird deaths every year and being a fatal obstacle for many

migratory shorebirds. Singapore’s National Parks Board (NParks) serves as the

governmental custodian of all biodiversity matters in the city, but currently lacks a

rigorous system for monitoring bird collisions or coordinated efforts in engaging

building owners to install bird-friendly solutions.

This proposal is designed to help NParks tackle the issue of bird collisions in

Singapore via a systematic two-phased approach. First, NParks can create a

collaborative data ecosystem that tracks bird collisions across the city, leveraging its

existing citywide biodiversity database and mobile fieldwork app while onboarding a

range of government, research, and grassroot partners for an expanded data

collection effort. With the data, collision hotspots and collision-prone species can be

identified. Next, NParks can engage building owners in collision hotspots,

incentivizing and collaborating with them to implement bird-friendly solutions. This

would include co-sponsoring installation costs to alleviate their financial concerns,

working with tech innovation agencies to design cheap and portable bird-repelling

devices for scalable deployment at partner buildings, and creating a bird-safe label

to recognize bird-safe buildings. This document also identifies key opportunities,

challenges, and organizational requirements for executing this proposal.

3

BACKGROUND

Why do birds collide into buildings?

Although birds are ubiquitous residents in modern cities, they are not as

adapted to the urban jungle as most might think. A single stationary

skyscraper could be a deadly obstacle for birds flying through a city for two

simple reasons. Firstly, birds are unable to identify clear glass surfaces as

physical barriers, nor can they comprehend reflections in glass. Hence,

many birds collide into windows at full speed and perish on impact.

Secondly, migratory birds, especially, are disoriented by artificial building

lights at night. Birds are attracted to these lights and might fly around them

confusedly, eventually leading to over-exhau

0

AN INTELLIGENT FIRST-AID PLATFORM FOR THE TIANJIN MEDICAL

EMERGENCY CENTER (TJMEC)

CUSP-GX 7003 Civic Analytics and Urban Intelligence

Final Report

Yinuo Zhao

16/12/2021

1 | Page

Table of Contents

❖ Introduction 2

❖ Background & Motivation 2

❖ Assessment of the Organization and Operation 3

❖ Platform Vision 4

❖ Challenges 6

❖ Solutions to Challenges 6

❖ Future Strategies 8

❖ Conclusion 8

❖ References 9

2 | Page

Introduction

The Tianjin Medical Emergency Center (TJMEC) is the only core medical emergency center

located in Tianjin, China. The TJMEC uses phone calls to communicate with hospitals about

the availability of space and doctors in hospitals. This is a very time-consuming process for

connecting patients and hospitals to dispatched ambulances. The TJMEC is accused of

having an ineffective rescue process for their slow reactions in a few emergencies. There is

an urgent need for actions to be taken to improve the situation. To solve the problem, I

propose a platform based on computer technology like smart intelligence to make the first-aid

process of the TJMEC more efficient through data sharing and management. The platform

will have access to the ambulance command system and mobile electronic medical records. It

will consistently work with hospitals in case of any emergency. Intelligent technology and

big data can help the TJMEC meet the needs of more emergency and severe cases for quality

service in today’s society.

Background & Motivation

The TJMEC is responsible for receiving all emergency calls and providing emergency services

for nearly 14 million citizens (Tianji

Civic Analytics Fall 2021 | Final Project | December 10, 2021

How the NYC Parks Department can use
urban forest analysis to reduce flood risk

Executive summary

Flooding caused by extreme rainfall is an urgent
and growing threat to New York City. Hurricane
Ida demonstrated the deadly and catastrophic
consequences of climate change and particularly
the vulnerability for the City’s low-income
residents and communities of color.

One of the fastest and most cost-effective ways
to mitigate the city’s flood risk is by expanding
green spaces and adding trees which can
naturally absorb and slow stormwater. As
stewards of the City’s street trees and green
spaces, the NYC Parks has a vital role to play in
the resilience effort. As new attention is paid
(and new funding committed) to flood
prevention, it is critical to understand where
green assets can mitigate flooding.

Newly available data and technical tools can
predict flood vulnerability and evaluate the
capacity of street trees, natural areas, and green
infrastructure to reduce the risk of catastrophic
flooding.

NYC Parks has track record of success using
emerging technologies to manage natural
resources and it has forged successful
partnerships with other City departments and
outside entities.

NYC Parks should partner with an outside
research entity to analyze and predict where
trees and green spaces can reduce the greatest
flood vulnerabilities.

The resulting maps and analysis can direct
planning for green infrastructure and prioritize
projects as the city makes increasing funding
commitments to flood mitigation projects. 1

1

top: Brooklyn Bridge Park
bottom: hazard vulnerability1

New York City faces a growing flood risk
Hurricane Ida’s tragic consequences are a warning: flooding caused by extreme rainfall is an
urgent and growing danger for New York City. 2

Climate change will increase the threat of flooding

Two record-setting rainfall events this summer are a sign of things to come. Hurricane Ida
dropped more than 3 inches of rain in an hour, nearly double the most severe deluge recorded
before this year. Such once-extreme events will become more common as the climate changes. 3 4

The most extreme storms are also the most likely to be locally concentrated, creating conditions
more likely to produce flooding.5

Flooding puts vulnerable New Yorkers most at risk
New York City’s flood risk is inequitable. Many
neighborhoods home to low-income residents and
communities of color are at greater risk of flooding (in
part because of historic underinvestment in
infrastructure in these segregated neighborhoods) . 6

Moreover, the economic precarity of marginalized
communities makes them more vulnerable in
disasters. Most of the victims of

Civic Analytics Fall 2021 | Final Project | December 10, 2021

How the NYC Parks Department can use
urban forest analysis to reduce flood risk

Executive summary

Flooding caused by extreme rainfall is an urgent
and growing threat to New York City. Hurricane
Ida demonstrated the deadly and catastrophic
consequences of climate change and particularly
the vulnerability for the City’s low-income
residents and communities of color.

One of the fastest and most cost-effective ways
to mitigate the city’s flood risk is by expanding
green spaces and adding trees which can
naturally absorb and slow stormwater. As
stewards of the City’s street trees and green
spaces, the NYC Parks has a vital role to play in
the resilience effort. As new attention is paid
(and new funding committed) to flood
prevention, it is critical to understand where
green assets can mitigate flooding.

Newly available data and technical tools can
predict flood vulnerability and evaluate the
capacity of street trees, natural areas, and green
infrastructure to reduce the risk of catastrophic
flooding.

NYC Parks has track record of success using
emerging technologies to manage natural
resources and it has forged successful
partnerships with other City departments and
outside entities.

NYC Parks should partner with an outside
research entity to analyze and predict where
trees and green spaces can reduce the greatest
flood vulnerabilities.

The resulting maps and analysis can direct
planning for green infrastructure and prioritize
projects as the city makes increasing funding
commitments to flood mitigation projects. 1

1

top: Brooklyn Bridge Park
bottom: hazard vulnerability1

New York City faces a growing flood risk
Hurricane Ida’s tragic consequences are a warning: flooding caused by extreme rainfall is an
urgent and growing danger for New York City. 2

Climate change will increase the threat of flooding

Two record-setting rainfall events this summer are a sign of things to come. Hurricane Ida
dropped more than 3 inches of rain in an hour, nearly double the most severe deluge recorded
before this year. Such once-extreme events will become more common as the climate changes. 3 4

The most extreme storms are also the most likely to be locally concentrated, creating conditions
more likely to produce flooding.5

Flooding puts vulnerable New Yorkers most at risk
New York City’s flood risk is inequitable. Many
neighborhoods home to low-income residents and
communities of color are at greater risk of flooding (in
part because of historic underinvestment in
infrastructure in these segregated neighborhoods) . 6

Moreover, the economic precarity of marginalized
communities makes them more vulnerable in
disasters. Most of the victims of