Chat with us, powered by LiveChat 4-pages report (times new roman, 12, single spaced), citing at least 3 academic references (from handbooks, academic journals, case studies): – Page 1: describe what is organizational culture and comp | paledu.org
  

4-pages report (times new roman, 12, single spaced), citing at least 3 academic references (from handbooks, academic journals, case studies):

Page 1: describe what is organizational culture and company brand (Describe theoretical concepts and provide examples);

Page 2: describe the selection of candidate employee process (Describe why is important to assess and include the employee’s personality in business, and how candidate can be assessed by interviews and tests. Provide examples);

Page 3: describe how to motivate and engage employees (Describe theoretical concepts and provide examples);

Page 4: describe how to manage training and compensation (Describe theoretical concepts and provide examples).

The grading will assess your capacity to demonstrate:

ü theoretical knowledge (comprehensive and exhaustive, and with clarity);

ü critical reflections on application to examples;

ü references inside the report and in the reference list must be according to Harvard referencing style

UV6787
Rev. Mar. 31, 2014

This case was prepared by Gerry Yemen, Senior Researcher, and Lynn A. Isabella, Associate Professor of Business
Administration. Data were gathered from public sources and, unless cited, were based on one of the author’s notes
and experiences as a training participant at the Disney Institute in February 2012, and as a family visitor to a resort.
The case was written as a basis for class discussion rather than to illustrate effective or ineffective handling of an
administrative situation. Copyright © 2013 by the University of Virginia Darden School Foundation, Charlottesville,
VA. All rights reserved. To order copies, send an e-mail to [email protected] No part of this
publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, used in a spreadsheet, or transmitted in any form or by
any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise—without the permission of the Darden
School Foundation.

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF HUMAN RESOURCES AT DISNEY

You can design and create and build the most wonderful place in the world. But it
takes people to make the dream a reality.

—Walt Disney1

Five-year-old Oliver wanted to see the animals during his overnight stay at Disney’s
Animal Kingdom Lodge. It was early evening, too late to get in the park, so his grandmother
took him to a scenic overlook at the back of the lobby. As Oliver walked around, there were no
animals to be seen, only clusters of trees, some grasses, and dirt trails below the overlook.
Oliver’s grandmother could sense his disappointment. This was Oliver’s first visit to a place that
was supposed to enchant children, so parents or grandparents would bring them back.
Expectations were sky-high.

Once Upon a Time: Disney’s Heritage and Traditions

I only hope that we don’t lose sight of one thing: that it was all started by a mouse.

—Walt Disney2

The mouse that started it all was a character idea born out of desperation. Walt’s original
character, Oswald the Rabbit, for which he had just signed a contract for an animated series, was

1 “Walt Disney Quotes,” JustDisney.com, http://www.justdisney.com/walt_disney/quotes/ (accessed May 28,

2013).
2 “Top 10 Walt Disney Quotes,” MoveMeQuotes.com, http://www.movemequotes.com/top-10-walt-disney-

quotes/ (accessed May 28, 2013).

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This document is authorized for educator review use only by Alessandro Cavelzani, Danube University Krems until Jan 2022. Copying or posting is an infringement of copyright.

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R E V : S E P T E M B E R 3 0 , 2 0 0 5

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Senior Lecturer Sandra J. Sucher and Research Associate Stacy E. McManus prepared this case. HBS cases are developed solely as the basis for
class discussion. Cases are not intended to serve as endorsements, sources of primary data, or illustrations of effective or ineffective
management.

Copyright © 2001 President and Fellows of Harvard College. To order copies or request permission to reproduce materials, call 1-800-545-7685,
write Harvard Business School Publishing, Boston, MA 02163, or go to http://www.hbsp.harvard.edu. No part of this publication may be
reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, used in a spreadsheet, or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, recording, or otherwise—without the permission of Harvard Business School.

S A N D R A J . S U C H E R

S T A C Y E . M C M A N U S

The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company

The Master said, Govern the people by regulations, keep order among them by chastisements, and they will
flee from you, and lose all self-respect. Govern them by moral force, keep order among them by ritual, and they
will keep their self-respect and come to you of their own accord.

— The Analects of Confucius

James McBride, general manager of the new Ritz-Carlton in Washington, D.C., faced the largest

challenge of his successful career. A proven veteran of the luxury hotel chain’s march across Asia,
McBride’s most recent assignment was as the general manager of the 248-room Ritz-Carlton in Kuala
Lumpur. Opened in 1998, the hotel was named “Best Hotel in Asia-Pacific” in the eighth Business
Traveler Asia/Pacific magazine Travel Awards Subscribers’ Survey and, for two consecutive years,
“Best Business Hotel in Malaysia” by Business Asia and Bloomberg Television.1 As Nikheel Advani,
food and beverage services director for the Washington hotel, noted: “James is excellent—we have
opened many hotels together. In the place where you didn’t think that it had a chance, he made it the
best hotel. That’s his talent. That’s what he can do really well. It’s for the entrepreneurial person
who wants to get involved and who thinks they can make a difference.”

But this was a new situation, even for McBride. For the first time, The Ritz-Carlton was opening a
hotel that was part of a multi-use facility. Owned by Millennium Partners and located in the historic
Foggy Bottom district of Washington, D.C., the $225 million “hospitality complex” covered two-and-
a-half acres and included 162 luxury condominiums, a 100,000 square-foot Sports Club/LA, a Splash
Spa, three restaurants, 40,000 square feet of street-level restaurants and retail shops featuring the
latest

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M A R C H 1 7 , 2 0 0 8

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Professor Dennis Campbell and Research Associate Brent Kazan prepared this case. HBS cases are developed solely as the basis for class
discussion. Cases are not intended to serve as endorsements, sources of primary data, or illustrations of effective or ineffective management.

Copyright © 2008 President and Fellows of Harvard College. To order copies or request permission to reproduce materials, call 1-800-545-7685,
write Harvard Business School Publishing, Boston, MA 02163, or go to http://www.hbsp.harvard.edu. No part of this publication may be
reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, used in a spreadsheet, or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, recording, or otherwise—without the permission of Harvard Business School.

D E N N I S C A M P B E L L

B R E N T K A Z A N

Shangri-La Hotels

In November 2006, Symon Bridle, the newly appointed chief operating officer of Shangri-La
Hotels and Resorts, was reviewing the progress the Hong Kong-based company had made over the
previous ten years as it grew from a regionally focused business into a rapidly expanding
international deluxe hotel group. With 18,400 employees, 50 hotels, and $842 million in revenues,
Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts (Shangri-La) was a leading player in the luxury hotel industry. The
company was growing rapidly to satisfy increased demand for deluxe hotels and resorts in Asia,
Europe, and North America and Bridle was in charge of ensuring that Shangri-La’s signature
standards of “Shangri-La Hospitality,” a service model based on traditional Asian hospitality, were
maintained during this expansion.

For the past two weeks, Bridle and a task force of his top managers had been discussing a number
of organizational issues that presented challenges to Shangri-La’s rapid expansion strategy. There
were three major issues at hand: (1) the company was expanding into high-wage economies in
Europe and North America; (2) the company was expanding its presence in China—a country where
front-line employees were not used to exercising decision-making authority; and (3) newcomers in
the Chinese hotel market were poaching Shangri-La’s staff and driving up wages in historically low-
wage markets.

All of these issues weighed on Bridle’s mind as he wondered what he should do next. “How do
you still articulate your brand in tight labor markets with these pressure points?” he pondered.

Corporate Background

Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts, a deluxe Asian hotel chain, was founded in 1971 in Singapore by
the Malaysian-Chinese tycoon Robert Kuok. Inspired by British author James Hilton’s legendary
novel Lost Horizon, the