Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Political SOCIOLOGY Theory | paledu.org
  

Outlaw Project

Due date: Tuesday, December 6, 2022 by 11:59 pm to TCU Online

In reflecting on contemporary politics, political theorist Agamben (1998) writes that “homo sacer” or “sacred man” is he who “may be killed but not sacrificed” (p.82). Another term for “homo sacer” is an “outlaw,” or someone who is not afforded full political rights of a community and can be punished outside the law. Along with other political theorists, Agamben argues that a quintessential feature of contemporary politics is how states define whose lives are valuable and whose lives can be made exceptions to the law and may be extinguished.

In this project, you will closely investigate and research a type of “outlaw” to understand how a particular state defines and assigns value to human life. You will draw on existing course material as well as new sources that you locate to prepare your paper.

You are invited to study an “outlaw” in one of the following three contexts (or another context with approval):

·
Forced disappearance: a type of state violence in which the state (or state-affiliated forces) abduct an individual on suspicion of illegal behavior and hold them in an undisclosed location in the absence of formal charges or conviction; sometimes “the disappeared” are subsequently murdered by the state but their deaths are never confirmed.

· See the
Working Group on Enforced and Involuntary Disappearances website for information about how forced disappearance unfolds on an international level.

· Certain types of femicide (or “femicidio” in the Americas) may also be appropriate in this context.

·
Extrajudicial punishment: a type of state violence in which an individual faces brutality and acts of violence in the absence of being formally charged and convicted of a particular crime.

· See
coverage of global protests against police brutality for inspiration about cases beyond the U.S. or consider drones, as we studied with the Chamayou reading. The study of refugees and the violence they face might also be appropriate to study here.

·
Immigrant detention: a type of state violence that that removes an individual from a public life and confines them with or without formal judgment about their legal status in a process called “administrative holding.”

· See
Global Detention Project website for information about how detention unfolds

How To:

In-Text Citations and References

For all writing assignments in this course, you are expected to properly cite the texts you use to discuss a given concept. References and citations relate to the issue of plagiarism – it is important to cite and reference ideas that are not your own. Good citation practices are, therefore, central to being an honest writer who acknowledges the contributions of others.

Please use the following guidelines to prepare your in-text citations and references:

IN-TEXT CITATIONS

· The purpose of in-text citations is to provide information about the source of any statement you make in your paper. These should be inserted in any sentence you write that draws on the work of other people.

· There are multiple ways of making in-text citations. They can fall generally into three categories:

1. If you decide to specifically reference an author’s argument in your paper using your own words, you should do the following:

· You put the author’s name and the date of the publication in parentheses.

·
Example:
MacKinnon (1989) argues that the state institutionalizes a male point of view in law.

2. If you decide to make a statement in your own words that is a point made by another author, you should do the following:

· You use the author’s name and date of publication at the end of the sentence. Even though you are not saying in the sentence that this is MacKinnon’s argument, you are indicating that this is her idea by using this citation format.

·
Example: The state institutionalizes a male point of view in law
(MacKinnon 1989).

3. If you decide to quote directly from another person’s work in your paper, you should do the following:

· You should always include the page number when you quote directly from an author. You have two options, however, for how you reference the author

·
Example:
MacKinnon (1989) defines the state as “x”
(p. x)

·
Example:
The state can be defined as “x”
(MacKinnon 1989; p. x)

REFERENCES

· At the end of your paper, please include a section entitled “References” and include the full citation of any book, news article, journal article, or web source you used in your paper. This should reflect the in-text citations – in other words, for every in-text citation you have, there should be a reference for the work so that the reader can find out more information about the publication you referenced in the paper.

· There are several different reference styles (including MLA, Chicago, ASA, and so forth). You may use

Tools for Locating Scholarly Research

Identifying scholarship:

· What is “peer review” research?

· Anatomy of an article and its distinctive features: look for an “abstract” (this is a key sign that it is peer-reviewed academic research)


Step 1: Search Broadly in Databases

· Library databases: Databases can be organized by subject and frequently contain scholarly journals, exclusively. Others have a mix of scholarly journals, popular magazines, newspapers and other material. In many of these databases, you can limit your search to scholarly (peer-reviewed) journals.

· To find scholarship published in the discipline of sociology and the social sciences, I encourage you to conduct searches in the following databases.

· From lib.tcu.edu, click on “Databases”:

·
SocINDEX with Full Text

·
Sociological Abstracts


Step 2: Search Specific Journals

· Academic journals can be broad in scope or can focus on particular sub-fields of disciplines and different journals have different levels of intellectual rigor and impact. General journals in the discipline of sociology include:

·

American Journal of Sociology
[https://www.jstor.org/journal/amerjsoci]

·

American Sociological Review
[https://journals.sagepub.com/home/asr]

·

Social Forces

[https://academic.oup.com/sf]

·

Social Problems

[https://academic.oup.com/socpro]

·

Annual Review of Sociology
[provides overview of sub-fields within sociology – very helpful for finding a literature review about a topic; https://www.annualreviews.org/journal/soc]

· As you refine your topic, it will be helpful to search in specific journals that relate to your area of study. Some journals that are important for the studies related to politics and social groups include:

·

Critical Sociology
(good for research about capitalism)
[https://journals.sagepub.com/home/crs]

·

Politics & Society

[https://journals.sagepub.com/home/pas]

·

Ethnic and Racial Studies

[https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rers20/current]

·

Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power
[https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/gide20]


Step 3: Other Appropriate Sources

·
Books: A primary mode of disseminating research findings in many disciplines is through books. It is therefore importan